Fall, Food & Nutrition, Mains, Recipes, Seasons, Vegan, Winter

Zuppa di Ribollita | A Tuscan Stew {Vegan}

ZUPPA DI RIBOLLITA | A Tuscan Stew {V}

Fall and winter are perfect seasons for hearty stew and a perfect time to try to make Zuppa di Ribollita, a Tuscan Stew.  Literally meaning re-boiled, this is a great dish to make all year long and it can also be easily re-heated and taken for lunch.  Some sources date Zuppa di Ribollita back to the Middle Ages, when the servants gathered up food-soaked bread trenchers from feudal lords’ banquets and boiled them for their own dinners.

This potage is made in many different ways, but always calls for leftover bread.  And living in Paris, there is never a shortage of bread so this is a go-to for me.

A couple of notes: The first time I made Zuppa di Ribollita, I used raw white beans, which meant that I had to soak them overnight.  Also, living in Paris made it a bit tricky to find kale, although over the last year or so, it seems to be popping up everywhere.  I also love the mashed beans thrown in at the end- it gives the soup a creamy consistency without any added dairy.

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Zuppa di Ribollita | A Tuscan Stew {V}

INGREDIENTS

3 tablespoons extra-virgin cold-pressed olive oil, plus more for drizzling
1 medium red onion, chopped
3 celery stalks, chopped
3 medium cloves garlic, chopped
2 medium carrots, any color will do
1 zucchini or winter squash, chopped *I didn’t have any when I made this recipe
1 14-ounce / 400 ml can crushed tomatoes
1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
2-3 bay leaves
1 pound / 16 ounces / 450g cavolo nero (lacinato kale, Tuscan kale), stems trimmed off and leaves well chopped
4 cups / 22 oz / 620g cooked white beans
8 cups vegetable broth (some contain palm oil so good to double check)
1/2 pound / 8 oz / 225g crust less loaf of bread  (*If Paris-based, check out Du Pain et des Idees’s famous Pain des Amis | 34 rue Yves Toudic 75010 Paris)
1 1/2+ teaspoons fine grain sea salt
zest of one lemon
basil or flat parsley and chopped black olives to garnish

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Du Pain et Des Idees

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METHOD

In your largest thick-bottomed pot over medium heat combine the cold-pressed olive oil, garlic, celery, carrot, and red onion. Cook for 10-15 minutes sweating the vegetables, but keep watch so as to avoid any browning.  Stir in the tomatoes and red pepper flakes, and simmer for another 10 minutes or so, long enough for the tomatoes to thicken up a bit.  Stir in the cavolo nero (kale), 3 cups of the beans, and 8 cups / 2 liters vegetable broth. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat, and simmer until the greens are tender, about 15 minutes.

In the meantime, mash or puree the remaining beans with water – until smooth. Tear the bread into bite-sized chunks. Stir both the beans and bread into the soup. Simmer, stirring occasionally, until the bread breaks down and the soup thickens, 20-30 minutes.  Stir in the salt, taste and add more if needed. Stir in the lemon zest.

Serve immediately, or cool and refrigerate overnight. Serve reheated, or “ribollita” meaning reboiled, the next day ladled into bowls.  It’s even better the next day as the flavors have had a chance to marinate.  Finish each serving with a drizzle of olive oil and some chopped black olives.

Makes a large pot of soup – enough for 10 servings.
Prep time: 20 min – Cook time: 60 min

Zuppa di Ribollita_8_Gold&Thyme

Zuppa di Ribollita | A Tuscan Stew {Vegan}
 
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Main
Cuisine: Itailan
Serves: 10
Ingredients
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin cold-pressed olive oil, plus more for drizzling
  • 1 medium red onion, chopped
  • 3 celery stalks, chopped
  • 3 medium cloves garlic, chopped
  • 2 medium carrots, any color will do
  • 1 zucchini or winter squash, chopped *I didn't have any when I made this recipe
  • 1 14-ounce / 400 ml can crushed tomatoes
  • ½ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 pound / 16 ounces / 450g cavolo nero (lacinato kale, Tuscan kale), stems trimmed off and leaves well chopped
  • 4 cups / 22 oz / 620g cooked white beans
  • 8 cups vegetable bouillon (some contain palm oil so good to double check)
  • ½ pound / 8 oz / 225g crustless loaf of bread (*If Paris-based, check out Du Pain et des Idees's famous Pain des Amis | 34 rue Yves Toudic 75010 Paris)
  • 1½+ teaspoons fine grain sea salt
  • zest of one lemon
  • basil or flat parsely and chopped black lives to garnish
Instructions
  1. In your largest thick-bottomed pot over medium heat combine the olive oil, celery, garlic, carrot, and red onion. Cook for 10 -15 minutes sweating the vegetables, but avoid any browning. Stir in the tomatoes and red pepper flakes, and simmer for another 10 minutes or so, long enough for the tomatoes to thicken up a bit. Stir in the cavolo nero, 3 cups of the beans, and 8 cups / 2 liters water. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat, and simmer until the greens are tender, about 15 minutes.
  2. In the meantime, mash or puree the remaining beans with a generous splash of water - until smooth. Tear the bread into bite-sized chunks. Stir both the beans and bread into the soup. Simmer, stirring occasionally, until the bread breaks down and the soup thickens, 20-30 minutes. Stir in the salt, taste and add more if needed. Stir in the lemon zest.
  3. Serve immediately, or cool and refrigerate overnight. Serve reheated, or "ribollita" meaning reboiled, the next day ladled into bowls. It's even better the next day as the flavors have had a chance to marinate. Finish each serving with a drizzle of olive oil and some chopped black olives.